Author Archives: Cheryl Scott

Speeding Development and Lowering Costs While Enhancing Quality: A BPI Theater Roundtable at the 2015 BIO Convention

On Tuesday, 16 June 2015, Thomas C. Ransohoff (vice president of BioProcess Technology Consultants) chaired a midday roundtable titled, “Stretching for the Trifecta: Innovative Strategies for Speeding Development, Lowering Costs, and Enhancing Quality.” He brought together a panel of four industry experts: Joanne Beck (senior vice president of process development at Shire Pharmaceuticals) Parrish Galliher (chief technology officer for upstream (Xcellerex) at GE Healthcare) Lynne Frick (director of continuous processing for the Americas at Pall Corporation) Mark Brower (senior research…

The Contractor Perspective: A BPI Theater Roundtable at the 2015 BIO Convention

On Thursday, 18 June 2015, Gil Roth (founder and president of the Pharma & Biopharma Outsourcing Association, PBOA) chaired a midday roundtable titled, “CDMO Challenges and Opportunities.” He brought together a panel of four industry experts: Thomas Thorpe (chief executive officer of Afton Scientific) Michael Riley (vice president and general manager of Catalent Biologics) Victor Vinci (vice president and chief scientific officer for Cook Pharmica) Amit Arora (chief marketing officer at Jubilant HollisterStier) Points of View The Pharma and Biopharma…

Special Report: A World of Difference — Biosimilars and Biobetters Offer Unique Benefits — and Risks

by John Otrompke, with Cheryl Scott and S. Anne Montgomery When the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the country’s first ever biosimilar on 6 March 2015, it had been a long time coming. After all, the European Union had approved the first biosimilar in 2006, and a number of others have followed in Europe since then. Still, the approval of biosimilar filgrastim, a recombinant colony-stimulating factor used to offset the complications of chemotherapy, was a welcome step…

Spotlight: Niche-Disease — Barth Syndrome

Barth syndrome is a serious X-linked genetic disorder that primarily affects boys. It is caused by a mutation in the tafazzin gene (Taz) that creates an inborn error of lipid metabolism. The condition is named after Dutch pediatric neurologist Peter Barth, who published his discovery of it in 1983. The syndrome often manifests at birth in a number of ways. Patients are born hypotonic, show signs of cardiomyopathy within the first few months of life, and despite adequate nutrition experience…

To Serve and Promote: A Conversation with BIO’s President and CEO

BIO is the world’s largest trade association representing biotechnology companies, academic institutions, state biotechnology centers and related organizations across the United States and in more than 30 other nations. BIO members are involved in the research and development of innovative healthcare, agricultural, industrial, and environmental biotechnology products. BIO plays a leading role in shaping public policy related to the biotechnology industry — at the state, national, and international levels. Jim Greenwood has been BIO’s president and CEO for 10 years,…

BioProcess Theater: Analytical Services

BioProcess International launched about the same time as a major FDA regulatory announcement that has radically altered biopharmaceutical development: The quality by design (QbD) initiative is an important part of the agency’s 21st-century good manufacturing practice (GMP) approach, which is changing how regulators review product applications and thus how companies must approach them (1). It has placed increasing pressure on analytical laboratories, whose work is more important to the success of biotherapeutic products than ever before. Backed by harmonized tripartate…

BioProcess Theater: Cell-Line and Process Development

Process development forms the core of BioProcess International’s coverage and interests. From cell-line engineering through seed-train and production cultures, the results of which are harvested and purified to yield a bulk drug substance, every biologic therapy and vaccine begins its life at small scale in a research and development laboratory.Cell lines may be mammalian, insect, microbial, or even plant-sourced (1). They all require different types of culture media and supplements. And purification options are many and diverse. Process intermediates are…

BioProcess Theater: Formulation, Fill and Finish

Fragile proteins and other biomolecules need protection as stable drug products. The larger a molecule is, the more difficult it will be to make, ship/store, and administer to patients. Biotech drug formulators have many concerns to juggle in their work, beginning with the physicochemical characteristics of an active molecule and including the reliability, cost, and availability of analytical methods; the array of excipients and adjuvants on the market; evolving delivery methods and devices; patient preferences and behavior, as well as…

BioProcess Theater: Clinical and Commercial Manufacturing

When it comes to clinical and commercial manufacturing of therapeutic products, outsourcing is an integral part of the biopharmaceutical industry. In the 21st century, product sponsors are increasingly relying on expert contract assistance in process development and production of clinical and commercial materials. Many companies are reaching beyond their local and national borders to extend networks of partnerships into emerging markets, particularly in Asia (1, 2). Most biologics are proteins, with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) dominating the scene over a number…

Spotlight

Niche-Disease: Pompe’s Disease by Cheryl Scott Pompe’s disease is a genetic disorder that causes a cellular buildup of the complex sugar glycogen. Its accumulation in organs and tissues impairs their ability to function normally. Since the disorder was identified in 1932 by Dutch pathologist J.C. Pompe, researchers have classified three forms of Pompe disease (also called glycogen storage disease type II or acid maltase deficiency): classic infantile-onset, nonclassic infantile-onset, and late-onset. The disease is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern.…