Manufacturing

Ask the Expert: Ultrapure Gelatin Can Optimize Your Excipient Screening for Vaccine Formulation

In his 28 May 2020 “Ask the Expert” presentation, Jeroen Geeraerts (business development manager at Rousselot) highlighted that, as of May 2020, 118 candidate vaccines for the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) had reached clinical or preclinical evaluation. Of those, 11 use inactivated and live–attenuated approaches, which require strong stabilizing agents to maintain vaccine potency. Geeraerts explained why inactivated and live–attenuated vaccines require stabilizing agents and why vaccine companies prefer pharmaceutical-grade gelatin for such applications. Next, Geeraerts described how his company’s X-Pure…

Democratizing Access to Cancer-Related Proteomic Data

The US National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched the Proteomic Data Commons (PDC), a next-generation proteomic data repository that will facilitate data access, sharing, and analysis to speed development of precision-medicine therapies for cancer. Housed within the NCI’s Cancer Research Data Commons (CRDC), PDC hosts several multiomic data sets that have corresponding genomics and imaging data elsewhere, simplifying their access to enable integrative research. Increase Access to Enable Discovery Mass spectrometry (MS)–based proteomic profiling for pancancer analyses could enhance our…

Peptide Therapies: Designing a Science-Led Strategic Quality Control Program

Peptide therapeutics are a unique class of pharmaceuticals. They can fall into one or more regulatory categories: as conventional chemical molecules, biological entities, or biosimilars. Developing a well–thought-out quality control (QC) strategy is key to meeting development milestones and complying with evolving regulatory requirements. Safety assessment is critical because slight changes in the structure, physicochemical properties, stability, and impurity profile of a peptide can provoke an adverse immune response. A robust analytical QC program should be conducted in laboratories that…

challenges with exosome therapy

eBook: Challenges in Industrial Process Development of Exosome-Based Therapies: Characterizing and Managing Diversity

The traditional classification of extracellular vesicles (EVs) includes three types: exosomes, microvesicles, and apoptotic vesicles. Each type arises from a distinct origin and exhibits distinct characteristics. The problem is that their size ranges overlap and that the major surface proteins presented by exosomes also are present on the surfaces of microvesicles and apoptotic bodies. This makes it a challenge for process developers to identify the vesicle fraction that best serves a particular exosome therapy. Anion-exchange chromatography (AEC) can fractionate EVs…

The Role of New Technology in Enabling Cell and Gene Therapies

Moderator Doug Miller, with Tim Kelly, Daniella Kranjac, Andy Ramelmeier, and Ran Zheng This part of the BPI Theater program focused on emerging bioprocess technologies and their implications for cell and gene therapy (CGT) products. Doug Miller assembled a panel showcasing a wide range of technical expertise and representing several CGT industry stakeholders. That pluralism yielded far-reaching discussions about what CGT capabilities exist, what advances could facilitate therapy manufacture, and how companies might pursue technological development. Viral-Vector Therapies Miller kicked…

eBook: Cancer Vaccines ⁠— Innovation Fuels an Immunotherapy Renaissance

Despite early successes a decade ago, cancer vaccines designed to deliver peptides or proteins — or nucleic acids encoding those antigens — generally have fizzled out since then. As a result, cancer vaccine development and the field of immunotherapy lost some traction overall. But as freelance contributor Jim Kling describes in this eBook, new innovations in product design, testing, and manufacturing are fueling a renaissance in cancer vaccine development. From checkpoint inhibitors to neoantigens, immune regulators, and beyond, companies are…

eBook: Formulation, Fill, Finish ⁠— Biopharmaceutical Drug Products for a Modern Age

Biopharmaceutical drugs are increasing in sophistication, requiring technological advancements to solve related challenges. The contributors to this BPI eBook highlight drug-product formulation concerns and collaborative efforts toward solving the fill–finish conundrum. First, the BioPhorum’s Scott Ewan describes a holistic approach to container–closure integrity and the organization’s work toward developing and expanding upon that approach. Ewan explores how advancing analytical technologies, risk management, and quality by design (QbD) are changing the strategies related to container–closure integrity, which remains a significant aspect…

Finding Efficiencies to Accelerate Biopharmaceutical Development

An old engineering adage says that in any technical project, you can get speed and/or quality and/or cost-efficiency — but you never get to have all three. The idea is that emphasizing any one of those parameters necessarily deemphasizes one or both of the others. For most of the biopharmaceutical industry’s early years, companies operated on that assumption. Many organizations saw speed as the weakest link that could be more or less ignored; others had money to burn. The smartest…

Biosimilars Pipeline and Market Trends

Most biopharmaceutical industry experts now consider biosimilars to be mainstream products, indicating that the field has progressed immensely over the past 10 years. Nevertheless, when comparing approvals and commercial offerings across the globe between 2013 and 2020, it becomes clear that some regions welcome these therapies more than others do. Western European biosimilars markets continue to be kind to these drugs’ production, distribution, and coverage; and companies headquartered in Asia and the Pacific Rim increasingly are getting involved in biosimilars…

The Green Imperative: Part One — Life-Cycle Assessment and Sustainability for Single-Use Technologies in the Biopharmaceutical Industry

Much has changed since large-scale single-use biomanufacturing equipment was introduced some 15 years ago. Since then, these materials have become accepted and established in production and downstream bioprocessing. Concerns about the environmental impact of single-use (SU) biomanufacturing equipment have become more prevalent as our environmental awareness has increased and related concerns have become more urgent (1). For example, many recommendations and even laws have emerged regarding plastic convenience packaging and products (2, 3). People have become more sophisticated in appreciating…