Upstream Processing

Development and Qualification of a Scalable, Disposable Bioreactor for GMP-Compliant Cell Culture

During the past decade, single-use bioreactors have become widely accepted for use in cell culture process development and clinical manufacturing. Their key benefits over stainless steel bioreactors are flexibility, cost, and time savings associated with the reduction of cross-contamination risks (1). Here, we describe our approach to development and qualification of the Biostat STR single-use, stirred-tank bioreactor. Unlike other stirred single-use bioreactors, it offers a similar design to that of well-established, conventional (stainless steel) stirred-tank bioreactors. Disposability of the single-use…

Amplifying the Possibilities

Polymerases are natural enzymes that are vital to nucleic acid synthesis: DNA polymerase for replication of deoxyribonucleic acid and RNA polymerase for replication of ribonucleic acid. Thus all living things make and use polymerases of their own. But in 1969, the University of Wisconsin’s Thomas D. Brock and Hudson Freeze identified a new species of extremophilic bacterium thriving at 160 °F (70 °C) in a hot spring in Yellowstone National Park. In time, heat-tolerant polymerase isolated from Thermus aquaticus (Taq)…

Single-Use Pumps Take Center Stage

The multibillion-dollar global biopharmaceutical industry is placing increased emphasis on development and manufacture of advanced biologics. Such products offer exciting potential for the development of drugs that could provide as-yet-unknown treatments for a wide array of diseases. One important goal is to commercialize biologic products as early as possible within the typical 20-year patent window. Patent submission must occur during drug development. Much work follows a patent filing, including further product development, toxicity checks, and clinical trials. Hopefully, US Food…

High-Yield Production of PASylated Human Growth Hormone Using Secretory E. coli Technology

Since the 1985 approval of the first recombinant human growth hormone (hGH, such as Protropin/somatrem human growth hormone from Genentech, now Roche), the number of clinical indications for therapy with hGH has steadily increased (1). That led to a highly successful drug with more than US$3 billion sales in 2011 (2). Even so, hGH shares a common problem with most other first-generation protein therapeutics: a very short plasma half-life of just about two hours in humans. Because such biologics are…

Implementing Disposable Sampling Devices for Fully Autoclaved Equipment

Sampling is used extensively to monitor both behavior and quality throughout biopharmaceutical processesing (1, 2). Methods must deliver representative samples and — more important — not compromise the integrity of a given unit operation or the process of which it is part. When microorganisms, animal cells, viruses, or nonfilterable materials are involved, sampling methods must not introduce contamination (see the “Regulatory Requirements” box). For successful sampling, three methods have been used routinely over the years: steam-in-place (SIP) valves; aseptic tube…

T-Cell Suspension Culture in a 24-Well Microbioreactor

Cell therapy promises revolutionary new therapeutic treatments for cancer and other serious diseases and injuries. For example, T-cell therapy response rates of >50% and durable complete response rates of 20% have been reported in patients with metastatic melanoma who had failed other therapies (1). In another example, sustained remissions of up to a year were achieved among a small group of advanced chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients upon treatment with autologous T-cells expressing an anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (2). Numerous other…

A Risk-Based Life-Cycle Approach to Implementing Disposables for Facility Flexibility

Plastic-based, single-use, disposables has been prevalent in biotech/pharmaceutical manufacturing processes for decades. Examples of such technologies include filters, gaskets, tubing, sampling bags, carboys, and ultrafiltration/diafiltration (UF/DF) capsules. In recent years, single-use technology has made great leaps in broadening the range of options and applications available. Disposable bioprocess containers are now widely used for applications such as media/buffer preparation and storage, bioreactors and cell culture operations, in-process intermediate containers for manufacturing operations, final drug substance/product containers, and so on. Customized solutions…

A Short History of Cell Culture Media and the Use of Insulin

A surprising history of cell culture media and the use of insulin, outlining the basic developments behind growing mammalian cells.

It will take you on a journey from the late 1800 where organ tissues were kept in balanced salt solutions -BSS- and later PBS, until the early 50’s synthetic media, over chick embryo extract and Eagle’s Minimal Essential Medium (MEM) or its modification by Dulbecco (DMEM). Finally describing insulin mimicking growth factors.

Gram Scale Antibody Production Using CHO Cell Transient Gene Expression (TGE) via Flow Electroporation

MaxCyte flow electroporation provides a universal means of fully scalable, highly efficient CHO-based TGE for the rapid production of gram to multi-gram level s of antibodies without the need for specialized reagents, expression vectors, or engineered CHO cell lines. In this technical note, we present data demonstrating the reproducibility, scalability, and antibody production capabilities of MaxCyte electroporation. Secreted antibody titers routinely exceed 400 mg/L and can exceed 1gram/L following optimization, thereby enabling multi-gram antibody production from a single, CHO cell transfection. In addition, we present data showing the use of MaxCyte electroporation for the rapid generation of high-yield stable CHO cell lines to bridge the gap between early and late stage antibody development activities.

Has Your Current LIMS Implementation Been a Nightmare?

Because current traditional LIMS have not delivered on their promise, many organizations are still searching for solutions to optimize their laboratory operations. For those engaged in deploying traditional LIMS, frequent sleep-disturbing issues include poor flexibility and configurability, expensive and time-consuming customization, difficulties extending and upgrading systems, poor usability, lack of modular functionality, poor service/support, problems integrating with existing instrumentation/IT systems and extra time and resources required to meet critical qualification/compliance requirements. Learn how you can avoid the top 5 LIMS nightmares and rest easier with today’s next-generation process and execution-centric LIMS.