Author Archives: Jamie Freeman

Ask the Expert November: Improving CHO-Cell Biomanufacturing with a Whole-Genome CRISPR Screening

On 18 October 2018, BPI presented a free “Ask the Expert” webinar with Jamie Freeman, a bioproduction product manager at Horizon Discovery. His company is developing a whole-genome screen using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) for improving the capacity of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in biomanufacturing. Freeman’s Presentation Freeman described the screening approach that Horizon developed to improve its own CHO cells. It also may be used to improve other such cell lines for biomanufacturing. Founded 11…

Horizon’s Alternative CHO K1 GS Knockout Cell Line Drives Access to Cutting-Edge Biomanufacturing Cell Lines

Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the expression system of choice for the manufacturing of biotherapeutics. They have the capacity to express a range of proteins such as therapeutic enzymes or monoclonal antibodies at multiple gram per liter titers. As expression technologies have developed, obtaining such titers has been achieved mainly through improvements to media and feed. Similarly, the ability to identify high-productivity clones has been streamlined through the use of different selection systems, with metabolic selection being the preferred…

Ask the Expert: Developing a Whole-Genome CRISPR Screen to Improve Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells for Biomanufacturing

Great strides have been made in increasing the yield of biotherapeutic proteins mainly through process improvements with a focus on media and feed strategies. But aside from single-gene knockouts to allow for metabolic selection systems, the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) host cell line remains largely unchanged from what was used 30 years ago. In a webinar on 21 March 2018, Jamie Freeman (product manager at Horizon Discovery) focused on this as a bioproduction application of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic…

Heading for a CHO Revolution: The Need for Cell Line Engineering to Improve Manufacturing Cell Lines

The first recombinant protein licensed for use by the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) was human insulin in 1982 (1). That approval was followed in 1987 by the development of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), the first complex glycosylated protein generated in mammalian cells to be licensed for therapeutic use. Since then, this area of biology has rapidly expanded in clinics: The FDA approved an average of 15 new biological entities every year between 2006 and 2011 (2).…