Separation/Purification

eBook: Ion-Exchange Chromatography for Modern Biopharmaceutical Purification

Understanding the functionalities of chromatography resins can improve the product yield and purity in a biotherapeutic purification workflow. Ion-exchange (IEX) chromatography separates biomolecules on the basis of charge. For several reasons, it is the most widely used separation tool for purification of biopharmaceutical products. IEX is a well-characterized purification method with high binding capacity and flexible selectivity. It also works with mild operating conditions that help to preserve the biological activity of a biopharmaceutical drug substance. That versatility enables several…

Streamlining Industrial Purification of Adeno-Associated Virus

With its first licensed therapeutic now marketed worldwide (1), adeno-associated virus (AAV) has become a preferred vector for gene therapy. However, unlocking its full potential still poses challenges, many of which are associated with purification. The first involves the transition from upstream to downstream processes. AAV-bearing lysates are laden with debris that foul filtration media and limit or prevent concentration. Another challenge involves reduction of soluble host-cell DNA, which is complicated by its strong association with nucleoproteins. A third involves…

Exploring Resin Modalities for Biotherapeutic Purification

New chromatography supports must demonstrate improved selectivity, and bead technologies must be optimized for high binding capacity and product recovery. Drug manufacturers also need access to expertise and continued support from chromatography suppliers that can assist with method development and design of experiments (DoE) assessments. Working together, these industry groups can accelerate method development, increase process yield, reduce buffer consumption, minimize the number of unit operations, and improve overall process economies. Learn more in this Special Report about how resin…

eBook: Downstream Processing — An Overview of MAb Purification Methods

The downstream harvest, clarification, and purification operations of biologics are essential steps to ensure drug product safety. However, these process steps can be problematic for complex biologics. Compared with processes for traditional small-molecule pharmaceuticals, downstream methods for monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have higher risks of contamination. Thus, different centrifugation, filtration, chromatography technology and viral clearance/inactivation strategies must be applied to remove dead cells, host-cell proteins, viruses, and other contaminants. Several factors must be considered to determine which methods and technologies are…

A New Runway for Purification of Messenger RNA

A high-performing capture method is a critical bedrock asset for developing industrial purification processes. This is especially true for extended families of products that share highly similar chemical composition. Therapeutic monoclonal IgG is an example. The ability of protein A affinity chromatography to achieve 95% purity in one simple step was the runway that got recombinant immunotherapy off the ground and made it available to millions. In fact, protein A did more. Beyond giving the industry a foundation manufacturing method,…

Simple and Effective Method for Purification of DMT-On Oligonucleotides Using HIC Resins

Within the biopharmaceutical industry, oligonucleotide drug pipelines have increased significantly because of the effectiveness of such drug products in treating devastating diseases. Downstream specialists need improved purification techniques for such highly valuable materials. Dimethoxytrityl (DMT) is used to synthesize oligonucleotides and temporarily mask the characteristic chemistry of the 5ʹ-hydroxy functional group. DMT can be left on an oligonucleotide following synthesis to provide stability to a molecule during subsequent processing. Herein, we describe a novel, effective, and high-recovery method for purifying…

eBook: Mixed-Mode Chromatography for Purification of Biopharmaceuticals

Mixed-mode chromatography offers several advantages in downstream processing of biotherapeutics. Mixed-mode chromatography resins use ligands that are capable of at least two modes of interaction with solutes such as hydrophobic, ion exchange, and metal affinity. The interactions between stationary and mobile phases that result from those combinations enhance chromatographic selectivity, facilitating separation efficiencies that are not possible using other chromatography media. As this eBook illustrates, the multimodal approach can save developers time and money by enabling robust purification of biopharmaceuticals…

eBook: Viral Vector Purification — A Discussion of Current Challenges and Methods

Adenoassociated viral (AAV) vectors have become synonymous with gene therapy delivery. However, because they are produced in such small quantities and because their upstream processes carry comparatively large amounts of host-cell DNA and other impurities, AAV purification can be challenging. Several researchers have applied different chromatographic strategies, but no universal method has been adopted in the biopharmaceutical industry. This eBook features a discussion among several industry experts that explores challenges specific to AAV purification, shedding light on whether current strategies…

Dynamic Binding Capacities of Protein A Resins for Antibody Capture: A Comparative Evaluation

The dynamic binding capacity (DBC) of a chromatography resin represents the total amount of target protein that the resin will bind under actual flow conditions before significant breakthrough of unbound protein occurs. This is a useful parameter for predicting what the process performance of a resin will be in actual use. DBC affects the overall amount of resin that can be packed in a given column for a process — and the number of batches that can be processed cost-effectively…

Setting a Cornerstone for Platform Purification of Exosomes

Exosomes are a subject of rapidly growing therapeutic interest in the biopharmaceutical industry for two principal reasons. The first reason is that they are the primary communicators of instructions from source cells to target cells. Exosome surface features define their destination. They recognize complementary features on target cells, dock with them, and deliver their programmed instructions in the form of microRNA. The second reason is that exosomes are immunologically silent. As normal human cell products, and by contrast with gene…